Tips For Successful Turkey Hunting Trip

If you are going on a turkey hunting trip and you want to emerge victorious then you need to educate yourself on how to hunt turkeys like a pro. To be able to hunt turkeys successfully one should be able to mimic wild turkeys perfectly, in terms of tone, cadence and pitch. Moreover, it is also important to know one’s way around the woods.

Using multiple calls when you’re calling out to turkeys is a proven way of getting their attention and getting them to come near you. You should aim to call like a whole flock, which means you need to make multiple calls at the same time. It is also helpful to make slower gobbler yelps by dropping your jaw more when you’re making the call. Trying out the kee-kees may also prove to be beneficial for you. The kee-kee is the lost call of young birds.

For a successful turkey hunting trip you must use the terrain to your advantage, especially in case of turkeys that simply refuse to move from their place. Using the right friction call really does the job well, so you should observe the turkey and read its mood well in order to figure out how much you need to call. Also, keep your ears perked up for sounds of crunching leaves because it will tell you where you should aim your gun at.

Gobbling is not the only reaction turkeys make to the sounds they hear. If you were to observe these birds closely then you will notice that some of them may just strut or crane their necks instead of gobbling. If you spot a turkey then you should give it a few calls and maybe make wing-flapping sounds with the help of a turkey wing to trick it into believing that there is a fly-down. Sometimes, in case of difficult turkeys it also makes sense to form a ‘tag-team’ of sorts and to have a partner. This is particularly useful for birds that are difficult to call out to.

For more helpful tips and tricks like these, follow us in the American Southwest Magazine.

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